Papua New Guinea

At 463,000 square kilometers, Papua New Guinea (PNG) is the largest Pacific island state. Located in the South West Pacific, it is bound by the Gulf of Guinea and the Coral Sea to the south, Indonesia to the west, the Solomon Sea to the east and the Bismarck Sea to the northeast. PNG comprises the eastern half of New Guinea island, four additional islands (Manus, New Ireland, New Britain and Bougainville), and 600 smaller islets and atolls to the north and east.

INVESTING IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA

PNG has developed a strategic program for climate resilience under the PPCR to support mainstreaming climate change into national development planning and to build capacities of communities in vulnerable atolls and islands, government agencies, and civil society to plan and respond to climate change impacts.

A total of $30 million in PPCR grants and near-zero interest loans is helping to carry out vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans in target areas, pilot measures for sustainable fishery ecosystems and food security in nine island and atoll communities, and climate proof critical ports, roads, and other infrastructure.

FACTS ABOUT PAPUA NEW GUINEA

Approximately 30% of landmass is covered by forests, including four of the world’s remaining significant forests

37%

of the population lives in poverty despite PNG's vast natural wealth

Projects in Papua New Guinea

NAME FUND FUNDING (USD MILLION) COFINANCING (USD MILLION) MDB
  Building Resilience to Climate Change in Papua New Guinea Project / Additional Financing to Building Resilience to Climate Change in Papua New Guinea FUNDPilot Program for Climate Resilience COFINANCING (USD MILLION) 24.25 FUNDING (USD MILLION) 3.04 MDBADB  
  Climate Proofing Alotau Provincial Wharf, Additional Financing to Building Resilience to Climate Change in Papua New Guinea (BRCC) FUNDPilot Program for Climate Resilience COFINANCING (USD MILLION) 4.80 FUNDING (USD MILLION) 0.68 MDBADB  

TRANSFORMING VISION INTO ACTION

The CIF programmatic approach to investment planning and implementation brings strategic value to CIF recipient countries. Working through a transparent, country-led process, the CIF fosters trust and collaboration among government ministries, civil society, indigenous peoples, private sector, and the MDBs that implement CIF funding. Together, they translate Nationally Determined Contributions and other national development and climate strategies into an actionable CIF investment plan. Rather than one-off projects, the plan comprises long-term, sequenced investments that mutually reinforce each other and link to other critical activities, such as policy and regulatory reform and capacity building. Under national government leadership, CIF stakeholders continue to work together to implement the plan, continually assessing progress and sharing lessons learned along the way.