Lao People's Democratic Republic

In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a steady fragmentation of forest ecosystems and a decline in the average growing stock within the residual forest have reduced carbon stocks and impacted biodiversity and forest dependent people. Lao PDR is working to overcome these challenges.   

INVESTING IN LAO PDR

Lao PDR is using FIP resources to enhance its ability to overcome barriers that have hindered progress on the sustainable management and protection of forest landscapes. Its FIP investment plan for $30 million in grants and low-interest loans aims to complement ongoing REDD+ initiatives.

This includes strengthening legal and regulatory frameworks. The FIP is also supporting participatory forest management and sustainable environmental services at all levels (national, provincial, district), both in and out of designated state forest areas.

FACTS ABOUT LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC

Main causes of deforestation and forest degradation include fire, unsustainable wood extraction, pioneering shifting cultivation, agricultural expansion, industrial tree plantation, mining, hydropower, infrastructure development, and urban expansion

40%

of the country is covered by forests, down from 70% in 1940

Projects in Lao People's Democratic Republic

NAME FUND FUNDING (USD MILLION) COFINANCING (USD MILLION) MDB
  Protecting Forests for Sustainable Ecosystem Services FUNDForest Investment Program COFINANCING (USD MILLION) 12.84 FUNDING (USD MILLION) 21 MDBADB  
  Scaling-up Participatory Sustainable Forest Management FUNDForest Investment Program COFINANCING (USD MILLION) 12.83 FUNDING (USD MILLION) 27 MDBIBRD  
  Smallholder Forestry Program FUNDForest Investment Program COFINANCING (USD MILLION) 3 FUNDING (USD MILLION) 0 MDBIFC  

TRANSFORMING VISION INTO ACTION

The CIF programmatic approach to investment planning and implementation brings strategic value to CIF recipient countries. Working through a transparent, country-led process, the CIF fosters trust and collaboration among government ministries, civil society, indigenous peoples, private sector, and the MDBs that implement CIF funding. Together, they translate Nationally Determined Contributions and other national development and climate strategies into an actionable CIF investment plan. Rather than one-off projects, the plan comprises long-term, sequenced investments that mutually reinforce each other and link to other critical activities, such as policy and regulatory reform and capacity building. Under national government leadership, CIF stakeholders continue to work together to implement the plan, continually assessing progress and sharing lessons learned along the way.

Knowledge Center

  • Publications
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  • Jun 13, 2018
FIP Monitoring and Reporting Toolkit

  • Fact Sheets
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  • Jun 08, 2018
PPCR Fact Sheet